Good News! You’re Your Own Boss. Bad News! You’re Your Own Boss

Good news! You’re your own boss. Isn’t it swell? You get paid by how much you work—how many great ideas you come up with. The more you work, the more money you make. No one is telling you what to do. No one is shooting down your ideas. You can do whatever you want. You can realize all your great ideas.

Bad news! You’re your own boss. Isn’t it hell? You get paid by how much you work. No one is telling what to do. You got more great ideas then you know what to do with, so, paralyzed by indecision, you do nothing. Or you start doing something that could have a high payoff, but another great idea strikes you and you don’t follow through. There is no one to help you sort out your options and keep you on track.

A prospect shoots down your big idea and you’re discouraged and lose motivation. There’s no one to encourage you.

You have a knotty problem and there is no one to talk to—at least no one you can fully trust not to have his/her own ax to grind. Or maybe there’s a group of people that might help, but you don’t want to show them your weaknesses.

Is this picture familiar to you? It certainly is to me. I struggled for years trying to run my business alone.

Early in my career I had a friend who is a psychologist. He was more experienced and more successful at running his counseling practice then I was.

I visited his office and discussed my practice. At first he was very forthcoming. Then one day, right in the middle of talking to him, he picked up his phone and dialed someone else to talk to.

Confused and hurt, I got the message and didn’t bother him again. He was a good friend who couldn’t bring himself to tell me directly that I was eating up too much of his time.

Without his support my practice began to flounder. It made me really realize the value of a thinking partner. I searched for someone else to support me.
This time I hired my own coach and being my own boss was swell.

I had someone in my corner—a trained professional committed to my success. I could confide in him and tell him anything I want. No repercussions, no one else had to know. He helped me sort out my big ideas and decide which ones to pursue. He helped me make my own decisions, strategies and plans. When I promised to accomplish a goal by certain time, I’d do it, of course, because he held me accountable.He helped me play to my strengths and work around any blocks standing in the way of my success.

I experienced the deep satisfaction of making my big ideas work. I made more money and worked less hours. Yes, being my own boss was swell.
Do you have any similar stories? I’d love to hear your experiences.

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